Forests Forever

Restore • Reinhabit • Re-enchant

Richmond Hills Initiative submitted,
would safeguard threatened hills, oaks!

 
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A local initiative to save some 430 acres of unspoiled oak woodlands in Richmond's El Sobrante Valley now is headed for the ballot in 2017!

On Nov. 10 Friends of the Richmond Hills submitted about 5000 signatures to the Richmond Registrar of Voters. Forests Forever staff members and volunteers gathered signatures and helped "clean" the petition of duplicate and invalid signatures.

"We are thrilled to play a significant role in this important local conservation effort," said Forests Forever Executive Director Paul Hughes. "Native oak woodlands are fast disappearing in California, yet they arguably constitute the most valuable wildlife habitat of any forest type."

Launched in early 2016, the Richmond Hills Initiative aims to head off large-scale subdivision developments proposed for the area. Such projects would
destroy the oaks; introduce sprawl, noise, and air pollution; pose risks of erosion and siltation to area waterways; and threaten landslides on steep slopes.

Donate today to help Forests Forever continue this important work!

"We really could not have done this without the perseverance and commitment of Forests Forever," said Sarah Willner of the Richmond Hills Initiative campaign. "You really rocketed up our signature count, a weekly injection of optimism into our effort."

In total Forests Forever collected 2180 (over one-third) of the initial 6425 signatures. To qualify requires 4390 valid signatures.

In addition to Forests Forever, the measure has been endorsed by Sierra Club, the California Native Plant Society, and the California Wildlife Foundation.

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For the forests,

Paul Hughes
Executive Director
Forests Forever

Your contribution today will help California's forests thrive!

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Forests Forever:
Their Ecology, Restoration, and Protection
by
John J. Berger

NOW AVAILABLE
from Forests Forever Foundation
and the Center for American Places